Session: 1.7 Adapting farms to an uncertain future climate
Convenors: M. Bindi, J. Olesen, J. Porter

To avoid or at least reduce negative effects and exploit possible positive effects of climate change, adaptation strategies need to be considered, and Policy-making at EU level (e.g. CAP) may play a key role to set appropriate incentives and support adaptive measures (e.g. de-coupling farm payment, Pillar1 and Rural Development Regulation, Pillar 2). The adaptation strategies of the agricultural systems can be thought of as being applicable at different temporal and spatial scales, e.g., autonomous vs. planned adaptations, where autonomous adaptation often occur at shorter and smaller scales (e.g. farms) than planned adaptation, which requires longer time and often concerns regions or nations. Changes in farming systems may be necessary in some areas for farming to remain viable and competitive. Specialised farms, especially dairy farms and arable farms, will probably respond more to climate change than mixed farms. On mixed farms (i.e. with both livestock and arable production) there are more options for change, and thus a larger resilience to change in the environment. Studies on adaptation of farming systems to climate change need to consider all the agronomic decisions made at farm level, and the economic considerations are very important in this context. This session intends to present state of the art of farm level adaptation to cope with future climate change, selecting papers dealing with the analysis of autonomous and planned adaptation strategies that may be introduced to avoid or at least reduce negative effects and exploit possible positive effects of climate change.